Clutch friction disc

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Clutch friction disc

Tom-413
I just purchased a pricey clutch from a well known supplier.  The clutch arrived fully assembled including the center, basket, steel plates and friction discs.  However as I was assembling the unit I noticed they had not given me two dished steel plates, they substituted a flat plate.  The steel plate nearest the gearbox was a flat plate instead of a "dished" plate with a raised center.  On further examination, all the friction plates were the 23 "cell" type rather than one 23 "cell" and three 4 "cell" plates.

Is the flat plate nearest to the gearbox going to cause me a problem?  Is there a reason the friction discs should vary in the number of friction "cells"?

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Re: Clutch friction disc

Jacob-73
Hi all

I was really hoping this thread would have taken off in a much more rapid, since I'm looking for answers in the same direction. Sorry Tom, I can't be of much help to your inquiery, but since I have just had my clutch apart you can have my thoughts on the dished plates. They help to create space for the rest of the plates in the clutch basket to move about when the clutch is engaged. This is important for a smooth handling. So the dished plates are a must.
The type, design and make of the friction plates is more of an unkown terratory to me. Obviously the material for the 4 cell type friction plate and the 23 cell type is different; but why? Beats me. I have purchased the Barnett friction plates for the Bullet (four identical 4 cell type), but will wait to install them untill I know more about why the difference in material and design for the stock friction plates.
Please all you clutch plate experts, enlighten us about friction plates.

all the best
Jacob


--- In [hidden email], "Tom" <tschmidt@...> wrote:
>
> I just purchased a pricey clutch from a well known supplier.  The clutch arrived fully assembled including the center, basket, steel plates and friction discs.  However as I was assembling the unit I noticed they had not given me two dished steel plates, they substituted a flat plate.  The steel plate nearest the gearbox was a flat plate instead of a "dished" plate with a raised center.  On further examination, all the friction plates were the 23 "cell" type rather than one 23 "cell" and three 4 "cell" plates.
>
> Is the flat plate nearest to the gearbox going to cause me a problem?  Is there a reason the friction discs should vary in the number of friction "cells"?
>


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Re: Clutch friction disc

Tom-413
I purchased my clutch with the flat innermost plate from a well know supplier that rhymes with Menfieldgear.  

The flat plate creeped me out, so I substituted a spare dished plate for the flat one.  The clutch has been slipping a bit, so I may try the flat plate if the slipping does not resolve itself soon.

I also posted this question on the CMW site and got this response from "AgentX" in Secunderabad, Hyderabad :

No, you don't need a rear dished plate.  I have the same clutch pack on my 5spd.  As long as the rearmost steel plate engages the splines on the clutch hub, you're fine.

I was concerned about it, too, but the dealer showed me that it's how they come from the factory.

Later I recieved this:
[recieved info from] Royal Enfield dealer in Secunderabad, Hyderabad.  Parts guy's name is Siva.  Call 'em.  I can't vouch for him being correct, of course.  Nor am I an expert in when and how RE has changed designs.  But I know what I see, and it's a flat rear plate which fully engages the splines on my particular clutch hub.

Been running it just fine, but hey, if you wanna find a dished plate, be my guest.


--- In [hidden email], "Jacob" <jacobtuelarsen@...> wrote:

>
> Hi all
>
> I was really hoping this thread would have taken off in a much more rapid, since I'm looking for answers in the same direction. Sorry Tom, I can't be of much help to your inquiery, but since I have just had my clutch apart you can have my thoughts on the dished plates. They help to create space for the rest of the plates in the clutch basket to move about when the clutch is engaged. This is important for a smooth handling. So the dished plates are a must.
> The type, design and make of the friction plates is more of an unkown terratory to me. Obviously the material for the 4 cell type friction plate and the 23 cell type is different; but why? Beats me. I have purchased the Barnett friction plates for the Bullet (four identical 4 cell type), but will wait to install them untill I know more about why the difference in material and design for the stock friction plates.
> Please all you clutch plate experts, enlighten us about friction plates.
>
> all the best
> Jacob
>
>
> --- In [hidden email], "Tom" <tschmidt@> wrote:
> >
> > I just purchased a pricey clutch from a well known supplier.  The clutch arrived fully assembled including the center, basket, steel plates and friction discs.  However as I was assembling the unit I noticed they had not given me two dished steel plates, they substituted a flat plate.  The steel plate nearest the gearbox was a flat plate instead of a "dished" plate with a raised center.  On further examination, all the friction plates were the 23 "cell" type rather than one 23 "cell" and three 4 "cell" plates.
> >
> > Is the flat plate nearest to the gearbox going to cause me a problem?  Is there a reason the friction discs should vary in the number of friction "cells"?
> >
>


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Re: Clutch friction disc

blltrdr81
In reply to this post by Jacob-73
My thought on the segmenting is for oil dispersion. The more segmenting the better dispersion. I would assume that since it is a wet clutch design you would want to squeeze as much primary fluid out as fast as possible when engaging. Any thoughts?

--- In [hidden email], "Jacob" <jacobtuelarsen@...> wrote:

>
> Hi all
>
> I was really hoping this thread would have taken off in a much more rapid, since I'm looking for answers in the same direction. Sorry Tom, I can't be of much help to your inquiery, but since I have just had my clutch apart you can have my thoughts on the dished plates. They help to create space for the rest of the plates in the clutch basket to move about when the clutch is engaged. This is important for a smooth handling. So the dished plates are a must.
> The type, design and make of the friction plates is more of an unkown terratory to me. Obviously the material for the 4 cell type friction plate and the 23 cell type is different; but why? Beats me. I have purchased the Barnett friction plates for the Bullet (four identical 4 cell type), but will wait to install them untill I know more about why the difference in material and design for the stock friction plates.
> Please all you clutch plate experts, enlighten us about friction plates.
>
> all the best
> Jacob
>
>
> --- In [hidden email], "Tom" <tschmidt@> wrote:
> >
> > I just purchased a pricey clutch from a well known supplier.  The clutch arrived fully assembled including the center, basket, steel plates and friction discs.  However as I was assembling the unit I noticed they had not given me two dished steel plates, they substituted a flat plate.  The steel plate nearest the gearbox was a flat plate instead of a "dished" plate with a raised center.  On further examination, all the friction plates were the 23 "cell" type rather than one 23 "cell" and three 4 "cell" plates.
> >
> > Is the flat plate nearest to the gearbox going to cause me a problem?  Is there a reason the friction discs should vary in the number of friction "cells"?
> >
>