Quiet here isn't it?

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Quiet here isn't it?

umrcc
Not wishing to prod anyone into unwanted discussion, but I'm just wondering why there's not much happening here. I had a look at a few other Yahoo groups, and they all seem to have much less activity in September and October 2012 than in previous years.

Is everyone using Facebook instead? Is Twatter killing sensible discussion? Is the art of conversation dying? Answers on a postcard...

I haven't been for a ride for a couple of weeks now, no excuses, although last time I tried to start the Japanese winter hack, the battery was completely flat. I have one of these little trickle charge devices which can be left plugged into the battery indefinitely and just comes on when voltage too low, works OK, but battery is not holding charge, goes flat within hours. Its around 4 years old, so time for a replacement I guess.

To make matters worse, my old Enfield - magneto ignition, so no battery required - refuses to give a decent spark despite the usual cleaning and adjusting. Looks like a mag rebuild will be on my Xmas list...

Martin

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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

Rick Ferguson
A good rebuilt magneto is a thing to be cherished.  I envy you the joy
you'll have when you've done it.  I had my BSA mag rebuilt by Stuart
Towner in the UK, and have also had good rebuilds done by Frank Deihl in
the US.

Martin, first, thank you for maintaining this and the BSA group.  In my
opinion you have struck just the right chord with them.  I have received
much pleasure and information from these groups, and not only about
motorcycles.

I think the art of conversation is dying, but that doesn't mean it isn't
worth supporting for those who appreciate it.  I believe it brings us
closer together in a time when this is sorely needed.  Waking up after
election day here in the US, I realize more than ever the world we now
live in is not the world in which we grew up.

Strange to say (and perhaps a little sad) but these groups provide an
anchor in the stormy seas that can be our lives.  I know my life would
be diminished without them.  Now get cracking on your old bikes, get
busy wearing out parts to keep our suppliers in business, and post up
your problems and adventures!

Cheers
Rick F

On 11/7/2012 8:45 AM, umrcc wrote:

> Not wishing to prod anyone into unwanted discussion, but I'm just
> wondering why there's not much happening here. I had a look at a few
> other Yahoo groups, and they all seem to have much less activity in
> September and October 2012 than in previous years.
>
> Is everyone using Facebook instead? Is Twatter killing sensible
> discussion? Is the art of conversation dying? Answers on a
> postcard...
>
> I haven't been for a ride for a couple of weeks now, no excuses,
> although last time I tried to start the Japanese winter hack, the
> battery was completely flat. I have one of these little trickle
> charge devices which can be left plugged into the battery
> indefinitely and just comes on when voltage too low, works OK, but
> battery is not holding charge, goes flat within hours. Its around 4
> years old, so time for a replacement I guess.
>
> To make matters worse, my old Enfield - magneto ignition, so no
> battery required - refuses to give a decent spark despite the usual
> cleaning and adjusting. Looks like a mag rebuild will be on my Xmas
> list...
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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

Gerry-43
In reply to this post by umrcc
Hi Martin,

Before committing yourself to an expensive mag rebuild there are a
couple of things I always check first, 1, make sure there is no oil on
the points I found this last time I got my 1939 M23 Silver Star BSA out
of the garage. Simply cleaning the oil off the points did the trick, 2,
take off the mag & pop it in a warm place for a couple of days (I use
the airing cupboard & pop it on top of the hot water cylinder) this
method has also produced good results in the past. Both are worth a try
before making a major investment.

Cheers, Gerry.

On 07/11/12 13:45, umrcc wrote:

> Not wishing to prod anyone into unwanted discussion, but I'm just wondering why there's not much happening here. I had a look at a few other Yahoo groups, and they all seem to have much less activity in September and October 2012 than in previous years.
>
> Is everyone using Facebook instead? Is Twatter killing sensible discussion? Is the art of conversation dying? Answers on a postcard...
>
> I haven't been for a ride for a couple of weeks now, no excuses, although last time I tried to start the Japanese winter hack, the battery was completely flat. I have one of these little trickle charge devices which can be left plugged into the battery indefinitely and just comes on when voltage too low, works OK, but battery is not holding charge, goes flat within hours. Its around 4 years old, so time for a replacement I guess.
>
> To make matters worse, my old Enfield - magneto ignition, so no battery required - refuses to give a decent spark despite the usual cleaning and adjusting. Looks like a mag rebuild will be on my Xmas list...
>
> Martin
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Your personal settings are at:
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/royalenfield
> Our old messages are at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/royalenfield/messages
> To unsubscribe, send a blank email to
> [hidden email]
>   Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>

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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

Tom Lyons
In reply to this post by Rick Ferguson
I am on a lot of forums on many varied subjects, and I find that the whole internet seems "dead" recently.
There's not much going on with most of the numerous forums that I post on.
My own forum has been okay recently, but it has seen some very low activity this year too.

I'm not sure exactly what is going on, but this year seems to be the lowest internet activity that I can remember seeing.




________________________________
 From: Rick F <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Wednesday, November 7, 2012 9:18 AM
Subject: Re: [Enfield] Quiet here isn't it?
 

 
A good rebuilt magneto is a thing to be cherished.  I envy you the joy
you'll have when you've done it.  I had my BSA mag rebuilt by Stuart
Towner in the UK, and have also had good rebuilds done by Frank Deihl in
the US.

Martin, first, thank you for maintaining this and the BSA group.  In my
opinion you have struck just the right chord with them.  I have received
much pleasure and information from these groups, and not only about
motorcycles.

I think the art of conversation is dying, but that doesn't mean it isn't
worth supporting for those who appreciate it.  I believe it brings us
closer together in a time when this is sorely needed.  Waking up after
election day here in the US, I realize more than ever the world we now
live in is not the world in which we grew up.

Strange to say (and perhaps a little sad) but these groups provide an
anchor in the stormy seas that can be our lives.  I know my life would
be diminished without them.  Now get cracking on your old bikes, get
busy wearing out parts to keep our suppliers in business, and post up
your problems and adventures!

Cheers
Rick F

On 11/7/2012 8:45 AM, umrcc wrote:

> Not wishing to prod anyone into unwanted discussion, but I'm just
> wondering why there's not much happening here. I had a look at a few
> other Yahoo groups, and they all seem to have much less activity in
> September and October 2012 than in previous years.
>
> Is everyone using Facebook instead? Is Twatter killing sensible
> discussion? Is the art of conversation dying? Answers on a
> postcard...
>
> I haven't been for a ride for a couple of weeks now, no excuses,
> although last time I tried to start the Japanese winter hack, the
> battery was completely flat. I have one of these little trickle
> charge devices which can be left plugged into the battery
> indefinitely and just comes on when voltage too low, works OK, but
> battery is not holding charge, goes flat within hours. Its around 4
> years old, so time for a replacement I guess.
>
> To make matters worse, my old Enfield - magneto ignition, so no
> battery required - refuses to give a decent spark despite the usual
> cleaning and adjusting. Looks like a mag rebuild will be on my Xmas
> list...

 
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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

fiferwd
In reply to this post by umrcc
Yes indeed.  For my part, I have been so wrapped up in family things that I have hardly looked at email.  Two baptisms and a proposal of marriage to my younger daughter, Caroline.  Looks like she will be living in Edinburgh.  I told Jamie that if he takes my little girl home to Scotland, he had better line up some grouse shooting on the Laird's estate when I come to visit.

Hey, does anyone out there have information on the existence of a redesigned, more durable sprag for the Bullet?  I heard rumors, but have been unable to confirm.  i am presently spragless, and have replaced the starter as a hole filler.

Ah, the battery thing.  I left my brand new one on a battery tender while rebuilding the engine, and had to replace it (the battery) when the rebuild was done.  Apparently, you can't leave them on indefinitely, have to let the battery rest from time to time I guess.
Yrs,
Bill D

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: umrcc <[hidden email]>
To: royalenfield <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wed, Nov 7, 2012 8:45 am
Subject: [Enfield] Quiet here isn't it?


 
   
                 
Not wishing to prod anyone into unwanted discussion, but I'm just wondering why there's not much happening here.

I haven't been for a ride for a couple of weeks now, no excuses, although last time I tried to start the Japanese winter hack, the battery was completely flat. I have one of these little trickle charge devices which can be left plugged into the battery indefinitely and just comes on when voltage too low, works OK, but battery is not holding charge, goes flat within hours. Its around 4 years old, so time for a replacement I guess.




   
             

 
 
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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

Bullet-3
In reply to this post by Tom Lyons
I used to get loads of mails, enquiries for all sorts 7 days a week but in the last 2 months i have noticed that from Friday to Monday it pretty well goes to sleep.

Interesting really.

Chris

--- In [hidden email], Tom Lyons <ace.cafe@...> wrote:

>
> I am on a lot of forums on many varied subjects, and I find that the whole internet seems "dead" recently.
> There's not much going on with most of the numerous forums that I post on.
> My own forum has been okay recently, but it has seen some very low activity this year too.
>
> I'm not sure exactly what is going on, but this year seems to be the lowest internet activity that I can remember seeing.
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
>  From: Rick F <twotyred@...>
> To: [hidden email]
> Sent: Wednesday, November 7, 2012 9:18 AM
> Subject: Re: [Enfield] Quiet here isn't it?
>  
>
>  
> A good rebuilt magneto is a thing to be cherished.  I envy you the joy
> you'll have when you've done it.  I had my BSA mag rebuilt by Stuart
> Towner in the UK, and have also had good rebuilds done by Frank Deihl in
> the US.
>
> Martin, first, thank you for maintaining this and the BSA group.  In my
> opinion you have struck just the right chord with them.  I have received
> much pleasure and information from these groups, and not only about
> motorcycles.
>
> I think the art of conversation is dying, but that doesn't mean it isn't
> worth supporting for those who appreciate it.  I believe it brings us
> closer together in a time when this is sorely needed.  Waking up after
> election day here in the US, I realize more than ever the world we now
> live in is not the world in which we grew up.
>
> Strange to say (and perhaps a little sad) but these groups provide an
> anchor in the stormy seas that can be our lives.  I know my life would
> be diminished without them.  Now get cracking on your old bikes, get
> busy wearing out parts to keep our suppliers in business, and post up
> your problems and adventures!
>
> Cheers
> Rick F
>
> On 11/7/2012 8:45 AM, umrcc wrote:
> > Not wishing to prod anyone into unwanted discussion, but I'm just
> > wondering why there's not much happening here. I had a look at a few
> > other Yahoo groups, and they all seem to have much less activity in
> > September and October 2012 than in previous years.
> >
> > Is everyone using Facebook instead? Is Twatter killing sensible
> > discussion? Is the art of conversation dying? Answers on a
> > postcard...
> >
> > I haven't been for a ride for a couple of weeks now, no excuses,
> > although last time I tried to start the Japanese winter hack, the
> > battery was completely flat. I have one of these little trickle
> > charge devices which can be left plugged into the battery
> > indefinitely and just comes on when voltage too low, works OK, but
> > battery is not holding charge, goes flat within hours. Its around 4
> > years old, so time for a replacement I guess.
> >
> > To make matters worse, my old Enfield - magneto ignition, so no
> > battery required - refuses to give a decent spark despite the usual
> > cleaning and adjusting. Looks like a mag rebuild will be on my Xmas
> > list...
>


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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

P Snidal
In reply to this post by Gerry-43
 

Before committing yourself to an expensive mag rebuild there are a couple of things I always check first,

Me 3!  I found that pulling the HT brush out and careful cleaning of all the bits, including the brass contact ring on the armature spool, the spool itself, and of course the brush, is a help.
It's not particularly productive to put your finger in a rag, add some suitable solvent (such as acetone, carbon tet, etc.) on the end, then insert in brush hole and kick over.  Can be exciting, though!  Nowadays, I think I'd stick to a spray with contact cleaner, then insert clean DRY rag, hold in place with popsicle stick or some such dielectric probe, and turn over as gently as possible. 

Don't forget the ground brush - behind a screw on the side.  And of course you'll make sure you have long enough brushes and spring tension.

The need for a new mag, these days, is a situation not to be envied!  Best of luck with it!
ps

__._,_.___
Reply via web post [hidden email] [hidden email] Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (7)
Recent Activity:
Your personal settings are at:
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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

Marv & Marg
In reply to this post by fiferwd
I used to take the battery out, put it in the house on a board as I had heard they drain out on concrete, put a battery tender on and all the supposed good things to keep a battery alive. I never had one make it all the way through a second season. Then, I got terminally bored with the whole routine and left a battery in for the whole winter, starting the bike once a month or so and letting it warm up for 10 minutes. The battery got through 4 more Canadian winters with temps in the -40 range for portions of the winter. So, screw the "Experts", start the bike occasionally and let the battery go down once in a while. A battery is made to go through cycles of charge and discharge. The battery tenders might be fine for Florida or the south of France but don't seem to work well in a cold climate.

--- In [hidden email], fiferwd@... wrote:

>
> Yes indeed.  For my part, I have been so wrapped up in family things that I have hardly looked at email.  Two baptisms and a proposal of marriage to my younger daughter, Caroline.  Looks like she will be living in Edinburgh.  I told Jamie that if he takes my little girl home to Scotland, he had better line up some grouse shooting on the Laird's estate when I come to visit.
>
> Hey, does anyone out there have information on the existence of a redesigned, more durable sprag for the Bullet?  I heard rumors, but have been unable to confirm.  i am presently spragless, and have replaced the starter as a hole filler.
>
> Ah, the battery thing.  I left my brand new one on a battery tender while rebuilding the engine, and had to replace it (the battery) when the rebuild was done.  Apparently, you can't leave them on indefinitely, have to let the battery rest from time to time I guess.
> Yrs,
> Bill D
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: umrcc <manorfarmrd@...>
> To: royalenfield <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Wed, Nov 7, 2012 8:45 am
> Subject: [Enfield] Quiet here isn't it?
>
>
>  
>    
>                  
> Not wishing to prod anyone into unwanted discussion, but I'm just wondering why there's not much happening here.
>
> I haven't been for a ride for a couple of weeks now, no excuses, although last time I tried to start the Japanese winter hack, the battery was completely flat. I have one of these little trickle charge devices which can be left plugged into the battery indefinitely and just comes on when voltage too low, works OK, but battery is not holding charge, goes flat within hours. Its around 4 years old, so time for a replacement I guess.
>


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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

Jack deBen
Marvin, I've had the same experience in longer battery life by just starting and using the Bullet regularly. I got seven years use from an inexpensive Wal-Mart battery.

Jack deBen
2001 Bullet 500 KS
 

--- In [hidden email], "Marvin" <MANDM1@...> wrote:
>
> I used to take the battery out, put it in the house on a board as I had heard they drain out on concrete, put a battery tender on and all the supposed good things to keep a battery alive. I never had one make it all the way through a second season. Then, I got terminally bored with the whole routine and left a battery in for the whole winter, starting the bike once a month or so and letting it warm up for 10 minutes. The battery got through 4 more Canadian winters with temps in the -40 range for portions of the winter. So, screw the "Experts", start the bike occasionally and let the battery go down once in a while. A battery is made to go through cycles of charge and discharge. The battery tenders might be fine for Florida or the south of France but don't seem to work well in a cold climate.
>
> --- I

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Re: Durable sprag

Royalenfield
In reply to this post by fiferwd



>
> Hey, does anyone out there have information on the existence of a redesigned, more durable sprag for the Bullet?  I heard rumors, but have been unable to confirm.  i am presently spragless, and have replaced the starter as a hole filler.
>
>

No such beast, sorry.
And even if it existed you would not want it, as in stead of having to replace an expensive sprag bearing, you would be stuck with even more expensive stufffed starter drive train.
Sprag bearings are a wonderous invention, but using them as a drive for any thing with the potential to suddenly counter rotate in another direction is a recipe for disaster.
Never worked for Norton, and was a complete failure for Triumph too.
Even in the UCE motor with the auto decompressor the sprag starter drive is still not 100% reliable.

Tim
N.Z.

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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

Bullet-3
In reply to this post by Jack deBen
We find that the cheaper quality batteries, or at least the acid style need to be charged every 2 weeks otherwise the cells start to go off.  So if the bike is used regularly then one can get a pretty good life out of it. 3 years for some of the Indian stuff, probably 12 to 18mths more likely.

It is also critical not to over fill the water as contamination of cells is easy. to much or to little is a downer.  If the bike tips over sort the battery water out quickly as the battery cover, holder and frame will not take kindly to it. we also find that when the batteries are have a good run and charge the acid gas leaks and messes with the battery cover, especially down at the key lock where it just drops off.

So good riding and good maintenance is required for a longer life battery. Maintenance free is by far the best though.

Chris
 

--- In [hidden email], "Jackson" <jack_deben@...> wrote:

>
> Marvin, I've had the same experience in longer battery life by just starting and using the Bullet regularly. I got seven years use from an inexpensive Wal-Mart battery.
>
> Jack deBen
> 2001 Bullet 500 KS
>  
>
> --- In [hidden email], "Marvin" <MANDM1@> wrote:
> >
> > I used to take the battery out, put it in the house on a board as I had heard they drain out on concrete, put a battery tender on and all the supposed good things to keep a battery alive. I never had one make it all the way through a second season. Then, I got terminally bored with the whole routine and left a battery in for the whole winter, starting the bike once a month or so and letting it warm up for 10 minutes. The battery got through 4 more Canadian winters with temps in the -40 range for portions of the winter. So, screw the "Experts", start the bike occasionally and let the battery go down once in a while. A battery is made to go through cycles of charge and discharge. The battery tenders might be fine for Florida or the south of France but don't seem to work well in a cold climate.
> >
> > --- I
>


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Re: Battery venting

Royalenfield


--- In [hidden email], "Bullet" <chris.bulletwallas@...> wrote:
 we also find that when the batteries are have a good run and charge the acid gas leaks and messes with the battery cover, especially down at the key lock where it just drops off.
>
> So good riding and good maintenance is required for a longer life battery. Maintenance free is by far the best though.
>
> Chris


If a battery is in need of topping up with distilled water very often, (Daily?)  then either the battery is too small or the charge rate is too high...

Tim
N.Z.

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Re: Quiet here isn't it?

Bare-2
In reply to this post by umrcc
Actually, Walmart batteries are one of the best on the market.
Bare
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Re: Re: Quiet here isn't it?

wayne soglo
In reply to this post by Bullet-3
I routinely get 8-10 years out of a battery, not kidding. I just replaced the original battery in my 2001 W650 and the original battery in my 2003 Bonneville is still serviceable. I've bought used bikes with cheap Walmart batteries and had them last 8 years after I've purchased them. Lots of good information available on the internet on how to maintain a battery. Most of what we hear are old wife's tails.




________________________________
From: Bullet <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Friday, November 9, 2012 11:57:02 PM
Subject: [Enfield] Re: Quiet here isn't it?

 
We find that the cheaper quality batteries, or at least the acid style need to be charged every 2 weeks otherwise the cells start to go off. So if the bike is used regularly then one can get a pretty good life out of it. 3 years for some of the Indian stuff, probably 12 to 18mths more likely.

It is also critical not to over fill the water as contamination of cells is easy. to much or to little is a downer. If the bike tips over sort the battery water out quickly as the battery cover, holder and frame will not take kindly to it. we also find that when the batteries are have a good run and charge the acid gas leaks and messes with the battery cover, especially down at the key lock where it just drops off.

So good riding and good maintenance is required for a longer life battery. Maintenance free is by far the best though.

Chris


--- In mailto:royalenfield%40yahoogroups.com, "Jackson" <jack_deben@...> wrote:

>
> Marvin, I've had the same experience in longer battery life by just starting and using the Bullet regularly. I got seven years use from an inexpensive Wal-Mart battery.
>
> Jack deBen
> 2001 Bullet 500 KS
>
>
> --- In mailto:royalenfield%40yahoogroups.com, "Marvin" <MANDM1@> wrote:
> >
> > I used to take the battery out, put it in the house on a board as I had heard they drain out on concrete, put a battery tender on and all the supposed good things to keep a battery alive. I never had one make it all the way through a second season. Then, I got terminally bored with the whole routine and left a battery in for the whole winter, starting the bike once a month or so and letting it warm up for 10 minutes. The battery got through 4 more Canadian winters with temps in the -40 range for portions of the winter. So, screw the "Experts", start the bike occasionally and let the battery go down once in a while. A battery is made to go through cycles of charge and discharge. The battery tenders might be fine for Florida or the south of France but don't seem to work well in a cold climate.
> >
> > --- I
>


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