Shifting with the other foot

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Shifting with the other foot

Bare-2
Yeah, I guess we all had to do that, although for most of us it was
probably 30 or 40 years ago.
So more recently I've had some other right hand shifters and was
switching back and forth on nearly a daily basis. It worked OK, but
sometimes I would catch the wrong pedal. Usually that meant downshifting
instead of braking, but it was a retarding motion anyway. What I really
learned was to put more credence in the front brake. That was always at
the right hand.
the whole thing is just a part of riding motorcycles, "Pau attention,
Pay attention, Pay attention!"
Bare

 >
 > Heres a start. Ive now owned a 1950 Model G for about 6 months. As I
live in Washington State (USA) and most of my riding since highschool
has been on American bikes ( I am 62 years old), I am having trouble
switching to a bike with the brake on the left foot and shifter on the
right. I have not taken any long runs yet, mostly to the store and back
where there is very little traffic so I can concentrate on which foot to
use when. I guess the other trick will be to stay off my Sporty for now
and just get used to the RE. Any one else gone thru this and have any
suggestions besides 'BE CAREFUL'?
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Re: Shifting with the other foot

Charles-97
Ive always been a believer in the front brake as well.  That first ride on this bike was quite comical.  I downshifted,  hit the front brake and when things seemed at their most confusing also declutched.  I think the neighbors thought I was even more crazy than normal. The rest of that ride, it was only around the block, I had my right foot held back between the pillon and the front seat! It kept me from hitting the shifter but wasn't very safe.

Anyone else out there have a Model G? I'd like to get in touch with anyone who does for when my common sense for repairs fail me.

:)


Sent from my iPad
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Re: Shifting with the other foot/Model G

umrcc
Yes - I have a 1952 Model G. My (ex) wife bought it for me on impulse at an art auction(?) in 1982, it had been owned from new by a farmer and had only 8,000 miles on it, been stood for years, I suppose your typical "barn find".  So it is very original, although not very pristine, I had nowhere to store it when we split up a few years later, so it was neglected outside for a long time.

Haven't done much work on it over the years - replaced front brake linings and wheel bearings, swapped carburettor a few times as the original pre-monobloc leaked and often suffered from blocked pilot jet. Bits vibrate off from time to time and it's now looking decidedly ancient/rusty and uncared for. I'm not keen to spend big money on wheel rebuilds for cosmetic purposes. It's still on standard bore, had head off a couple of times and always looks fine. Needs new valve springs but not keen to use unknown make. Top speed around 70mph, good fun, noisy and quite exciting, I show it no mercy but I do change oil and clean/adjust mag points gap meticulously. Frame flexes a lot when you really get moving on uneven roads, in fact not surprising as the frame looks thinner than a modern pushbike. The half-width 6inch front brake is useless at speed. You need to think a long way ahead, at least I don't need to worry about locking up, which is how I dropped my last (twin-disc) fast bike. Worst problems have been magneto related. For example, I set off to Paris soon after I got it and broke down a mile from ferry at Newhaven on the way out. Mag suspect, spark feeble. Adjustments, cleaning, new points, new plug, no result. Decided it would probably start when it cooled down, so pushed onto ferry and it just about started when I got through French immigration. There's a long hill out of Dieppe and had chronic misfiring all the way up, glad to make it to the top. 30 miles further, relentless misfire and stopped for fuel, stripped magneto by the roadside, started up perfect. Chronic misfire returned at the Arc de Triomphe and limped to mates house in Montparnasse. Stayed three days, didn't touch the mag, started first kick with perfect tickover, ran beautifully until 50 miles later on Motorway with no sliproads, misfire returned, down to 10mph in first gear, then it got worse! Torrential downpour, lightning and it ground to halt in middle of nowhere, on deserted three lane motorway. 3 inch deep river on hard shoulder, I sat down and laughed. No spark. No option but to strip mag again, no way to dry anything, as everything I carried absolutely sodden. No traffic in sight.  After two hours of buggering about still no spark, but in desperation put finger on slip ring and kicked over, massive shock, so reckoned there must be hope. Reassembled mag and she fired up. Made it to ferry. Back at Newhaven, customs wouldn't accept passport - it had been issued only the previous week and was just a sodden mess by now. Much delay and suspicion that I was up to something. Strip search was the end to a perfect day. Had mag rebuilt when got home. Have had it rebuilt three times now over twenty odd years, never totally successful, but I live in hope. I've spoken to so many mag specialists and my knowledge of Lucas magneto condensor problems was at one time second to none...

Martin

--- In [hidden email], Charles Hammer <capthammer2003@...> wrote:

>
> Ive always been a believer in the front brake as well.  That first ride on this bike was quite comical.  I downshifted,  hit the front brake and when things seemed at their most confusing also declutched.  I think the neighbors thought I was even more crazy than normal. The rest of that ride, it was only around the block, I had my right foot held back between the pillon and the front seat! It kept me from hitting the shifter but wasn't very safe.
>
> Anyone else out there have a Model G? I'd like to get in touch with anyone who does for when my common sense for repairs fail me.
>
> :)
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>


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Re: Re: Shifting with the other foot

Gerry-43
In reply to this post by Bare-2

Hi Charles,

My initial experience of this dilemma was when I purchased my first British
bike a 1969 Triumph Trident T150, up to that point I had only had Jap
bikes. It was also cafe racer style so not only were the gears on the other
side they were the wrong way up as well. It only took me around a week & I
could easily swap between left & right without thinking about it, now I
won't say its not possible to get it wrong as occasionally whilst doing an
emergency stop I have stamped on the gear lever but this is a rare
occurrence. So I would say don't worry about it just get a few miles under
your belt & all should be well, I don't have the Trident anymore we parted
company after 11 years. However I'm currently the custodian of 3 Royal
Enfields a 1939 BSA & a Moto Guzzi Mk1 LeMan, so as you see I still have to
change around a bit.

Cheers, Gerry.