primary chain

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primary chain

snowy495
What does the primary chain do in very plain english? What do I need to do to it for regular maintenence? I am reading Pete's manual. And it is a pretty well written thing but I don't have any real prior knowledge of mechanical stuff to fall back on....
Thank You, Enfielders.

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Re: primary chain

hipman
It transfers the energy from your piston/drive shaft to the gear box thru the clutch.  All those moving parts then transfer that energy to the drive chain/rear wheel.

The two most important things to maintain the primary chain are to keep the thing lubricated by following Pete's manual instructions and also not allow the chain to get too loose per Pete's manual.  When it gets loose, it start rubbing on all sorts of things inside the primary case.  You'll get more 'mechanical' the longer you ride the thing...it's very satisfying.


 --- In [hidden email], "snowy495" <snowy495@...> wrote:
>
> What does the primary chain do in very plain english? What do I need to do to it for regular maintenence? I am reading Pete's manual. And it is a pretty well written thing but I don't have any real prior knowledge of mechanical stuff to fall back on....
> Thank You, Enfielders.
>


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Re: primary chain

cjayheff
In reply to this post by snowy495
--- In [hidden email], "snowy495" <snowy495@...> wrote:
>
> What does the primary chain do in very plain english? What do I need to do to it for regular maintenence? I am reading Pete's manual. And it is a pretty well written thing but I don't have any real prior knowledge of mechanical stuff to fall back on....
> Thank You, Enfielders.
>

The primary chain connects the primary source of power (the engine) to the next subsystem in the drive train (the transmission).

Maintenance consists of maintaining the proper chain tension (or slack depending on if the glass is half full or half empty) and keeping the primary case filled to the proper level with the appropriate lubrication.

The primary chain in the bullet is very strong for the application (it is the same chain as used on the RE 650 interceptors I am told). But, if it should fail, what could happen? Worst case is that the flailing chain will punch a hole through the primary inter case and into the engine crankcase. Very expensive.

CJay


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Re: primary chain

Michael Bevins
--- In [hidden email], "cjayheff" <cjayheff@...> wrote:
Worst case is that the flailing chain will punch a hole through the primary inter case and into the engine crankcase. Very expensive.
 
 CJay

CJay, et al. -

I'm a youngster, only been around the RE forums for a couple of years... don't think I can recall anyone reporting a primary chain breaking.  Absolutely agree it would be an expensive repair - don't even want to think about the cost of all the stuff in it's arc of destruction...

Anyone have any knowledge/photo's of a primary blow-up?  

Mike and Stumpy in Michigan

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Re: primary chain

rider_read
In reply to this post by snowy495
It is bad if the primary chain gets too loose, but also if you make it too tight.  It gets tighter as it warms up. Pete's instructions are a little loose and what I do is place a straight edged rod across the two sprockets and just pull down lightly on the chain, lightly so you aren't actually pulling against chain tension, and its top  should be around a quarter to an eighth of an inch from the straight rod.

lawrence of Tonga

--- In [hidden email], "snowy495" <snowy495@...> wrote:
>
> What does the primary chain do in very plain english? What do I need to do to it for regular maintenence? I am reading Pete's manual. And it is a pretty well written thing but I don't have any real prior knowledge of mechanical stuff to fall back on....
> Thank You, Enfielders.
>


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Re: primary chain

Skip-8
Aren't you talking about the rear drive chain here?

But along those lines, as a newbie who hasn't gotten an Enfield yet (but is seriously considering doing so), what kind of 'maintanence' do you have to do with the 'primary' chain? -I've had plenty of drive chain bikes so I know how to adjust them and keep them lubed, but I've never owned a bike where one had to 'do something' with or to a primary chain??

Thanks,
drummer

--- In [hidden email], "Lawrence" <abjlaw1@...> wrote:
>
> It is bad if the primary chain gets too loose, but also if you make it too tight.  It gets tighter as it warms up. Pete's instructions are a little loose and what I do is place a straight edged rod across the two sprockets and just pull down lightly on the chain, lightly so you aren't actually pulling against chain tension, and its top  should be around a quarter to an eighth of an inch from the straight rod.
>
> lawrence of Tonga


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Re: primary chain

Dave Murray-2

Drummer,
Like most motorcycles, the Bullet has two chains. You can see the final drive chain from the gearbox to the rear wheel. There is another chain, hidden inside the large ovalish cover on the left side of the motor/gearbox. This, the primary chain, carries the power from the motor to the gearbox. It needs little maintenance, as it runs in an oil bath. All you have to do is keep oil in it, and adjust the tension occasionally, as they stretch a bit with use.
It's all in Pete's Manual
Best,
DWM

--- In [hidden email], "Skip" <drumwoulf@...> wrote:

>
> Aren't you talking about the rear drive chain here?
>
> But along those lines, as a newbie who hasn't gotten an Enfield yet (but is seriously considering doing so), what kind of 'maintanence' do you have to do with the 'primary' chain? -I've had plenty of drive chain bikes so I know how to adjust them and keep them lubed, but I've never owned a bike where one had to 'do something' with or to a primary chain??
>
> Thanks,
> drummer
>
> --- In [hidden email], "Lawrence" <abjlaw1@> wrote:
> >
> > It is bad if the primary chain gets too loose, but also if you make it too tight.  It gets tighter as it warms up. Pete's instructions are a little loose and what I do is place a straight edged rod across the two sprockets and just pull down lightly on the chain, lightly so you aren't actually pulling against chain tension, and its top  should be around a quarter to an eighth of an inch from the straight rod.
> >
> > lawrence of Tonga
>


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Re: primary chain

rider_read
In reply to this post by Skip-8
Drummer,

I suppose most modern bikes don't have primary drive chains because the transmission is combined with the engine as one unit and i suppose gear driven.  R E are a bit old fashioned and its best you get to know something more about them, maybe hanging out here a while or going to the other R E forums.  There is a good one for people like yourself, new to the game shall we say at <enfieldmotorycycles.com/forum>

Hope this helps,

Lawrence of Tonga



--- In [hidden email], "Skip" <drumwoulf@...> wrote:

>
> Aren't you talking about the rear drive chain here?
>
> But along those lines, as a newbie who hasn't gotten an Enfield yet (but is seriously considering doing so), what kind of 'maintanence' do you have to do with the 'primary' chain? -I've had plenty of drive chain bikes so I know how to adjust them and keep them lubed, but I've never owned a bike where one had to 'do something' with or to a primary chain??
>
> Thanks,
> drummer
>
> --- In [hidden email], "Lawrence" <abjlaw1@> wrote:
> >
> > It is bad if the primary chain gets too loose, but also if you make it too tight.  It gets tighter as it warms up. Pete's instructions are a little loose and what I do is place a straight edged rod across the two sprockets and just pull down lightly on the chain, lightly so you aren't actually pulling against chain tension, and its top  should be around a quarter to an eighth of an inch from the straight rod.
> >
> > lawrence of Tonga
>


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Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

Skip-8
In reply to this post by Dave Murray-2
Hi
I looked at Pete's Manual in the files section here and it almost scared me away from considering Enfields..! At 71 yrs of age, and after 30 years of riding, there's no way I would go back to having a bike I have to constantly tune up! -And do valve adjustments at evey 1K miles? -No flippin' way, bros! (Not even if just consisted of simple screw turning adjustments!) -There's no way I would again consider such an unsophisticated machine that it required constant fussing and adjusting just to keep it running!

It was the article in Cycle World about RE's that stirred my interest in the bikes, and it says this:

"They (Eicher Motors of India) have quantified everything and used extensive computer modeling in an effort to produce a fully reliable modern interpretation of a 1950s-era classic British Single.
....Oil flow was drastically increased on this wet-sump design, while hydraulic lifters for the pushrods were scourced from the US (looking a lot like H-D parts) so valve adjustments aren't neccessary!"

So it seems Pete's manual would have to be re-written for the 2009 REs, because it now appears that REs have gone from valve adjustments every 1K miles, to NO valve adjustments required now at all!

I know some of you guys like to tinker and work on your motorcycles, but for 30 years it's always been my outlook that the less I have to work on 'em, the more enjoyable riding time I'll have on 'em!
So while I'm sold on antique looks, what I'm really looking for is a standard motorcycle with antique looks and modern upkeep requirements. I'm no purist, and I ain't ashamed to admit it! The easier the manufacturers can make maintanence requirements for a given bike, the better I'll like it and buy it.

-Whether the new 2009 UCE Royal Enfields can actualy fill my needs out in the real world (and not just in a motorcycle mag artice) is probably yet to be determined, I'm thinking. But as I really admire the look and sounds of classic British singles (and twins), I'm keeping a close expectant watch on these new Enfields. (And if it don't work out, there's always a new Hinckley Triumph Bonneville for a few K more...) ">})

Namaste,
~drummer~ ">})





--- In [hidden email], "glssgrg" <redhawk34@...> wrote:
>
>
> Drummer,
> Like most motorcycles, the Bullet has two chains. You can see the final drive chain from the gearbox to the rear wheel. There is another chain, hidden inside the large ovalish cover on the left side of the motor/gearbox. This, the primary chain, carries the power from the motor to the gearbox. It needs little maintenance, as it runs in an oil bath. All you have to do is keep oil in it, and adjust the tension occasionally, as they stretch a bit with use.
> It's all in Pete's Manual
> Best,
> DWM
>

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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

deejay_nh
To each his own, have fun on your Hondaville.


--- In [hidden email], "Skip" <drumwoulf@...> wrote:
>
> Hi
> I looked at Pete's Manual in the files section here and it almost scared me away from considering Enfields..! At 71 yrs of age, and after 30 years of riding, there's no way I would go back to having a bike I have to constantly tune up! -And do valve adjustments at evey 1K miles? -No flippin' way, bros! (Not even if just consisted of simple screw turning adjustments!) -There's no way I would again consider such an unsophisticated machine that it required constant fussing and adjusting just to keep it running!
>
> Namaste,
> ~drummer~ ">})


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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

David in Fort Lauderdale
In reply to this post by Skip-8
Pete can speak for himself, but the new UCE is indeed designed to be fiddle-free. Check the gas, check the tires, check the mirrors and ride away, apparently. I've already advertised my blog once today, but I think you might find my post on the UCE interesting:

http://tinyurl.com/d3q6jn

For me (1999 Bullet) I need Pete's manual, and using it actually makes most of the chores pretty enjoyable.

All best,
David in Fort Lauderdale
www.royalenfields.com

--- In [hidden email], "Skip" <drumwoulf@...> wrote:

>
> Hi
> I looked at Pete's Manual in the files section here and it almost scared me away from considering Enfields..! At 71 yrs of age, and after 30 years of riding, there's no way I would go back to having a bike I have to constantly tune up! -And do valve adjustments at evey 1K miles? -No flippin' way, bros! (Not even if just consisted of simple screw turning adjustments!) -There's no way I would again consider such an unsophisticated machine that it required constant fussing and adjusting just to keep it running!
>
> It was the article in Cycle World about RE's that stirred my interest in the bikes, and it says this:
>
> "They (Eicher Motors of India) have quantified everything and used extensive computer modeling in an effort to produce a fully reliable modern interpretation of a 1950s-era classic British Single.
> ....Oil flow was drastically increased on this wet-sump design, while hydraulic lifters for the pushrods were scourced from the US (looking a lot like H-D parts) so valve adjustments aren't neccessary!"
>
> So it seems Pete's manual would have to be re-written for the 2009 REs, because it now appears that REs have gone from valve adjustments every 1K miles, to NO valve adjustments required now at all!
>
> I know some of you guys like to tinker and work on your motorcycles, but for 30 years it's always been my outlook that the less I have to work on 'em, the more enjoyable riding time I'll have on 'em!
> So while I'm sold on antique looks, what I'm really looking for is a standard motorcycle with antique looks and modern upkeep requirements. I'm no purist, and I ain't ashamed to admit it! The easier the manufacturers can make maintanence requirements for a given bike, the better I'll like it and buy it.
>
> -Whether the new 2009 UCE Royal Enfields can actualy fill my needs out in the real world (and not just in a motorcycle mag artice) is probably yet to be determined, I'm thinking. But as I really admire the look and sounds of classic British singles (and twins), I'm keeping a close expectant watch on these new Enfields. (And if it don't work out, there's always a new Hinckley Triumph Bonneville for a few K more...) ">})
>
> Namaste,
> ~drummer~ ">})


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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

Skip-8
In reply to this post by deejay_nh
Nuthin' wrong with Hondas in my book. I've owned plenty of good ones. Plus Yamahas, Vespas, and PGO (Buddy) scooters too. And who knows, I may even really like and buy a new and more reliable RE now! ">})

One thing I don't like tho is immature bikers who feel they need to 'protect' the brand they're obsessed with, so they have to put the riders of other marques down! Motorbiking is a sport I've loved for many decades, but unfortunately there's always been a few who feel they have to try to ruin the joy that others feel in the sport because these others may not think exactly the same way they do about it..

AFAIC there's nothing wrong with liking to work and tinker on older, less sophisticated vintage-style machinery. Nor is there anything wrong with not particularly liking to do this, but loving to ride!

Live and let live...
drummer


--- In [hidden email], "deejay" <deejay_nh@...> wrote:
>
> To each his own, have fun on your Hondaville.
>
>


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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

umrcc
I love motorcycles, and I love riding. Like many of you, what first
drew me to bikes was not just the experience of riding, but the
feeling that I'd become part of a special community--a brotherhood,
really. Nothing calms me more than a long ride down the interstate,
waving to the members of my beloved clan. Except when I pass Harley
guys. I hate Harley guys. Hate, hate, hate. When they pass me on the
highway, you know what I do? I don't wave. With their little tassle
handlebars and the studded luggage and the half-helmets--God, they
drive me crazy.

You know who else I hate? BMW guys. Oh, I do hate those guys. I don't
wave at them, either. They think they're so great, sitting all
upright, with their 180-degree German engines. God, I hate them.
They're almost as bad as those old bastards on their touring
motorcycles. You know what I call those bikes? "Two-wheeled couches!"
Get it? Because they're so big. They drive around like they've got
all day. Appreciate the scenery somewhere else, Grampa, and while
you're at it, I'm not waving to you.

Ducati guys--I don't wave at them either. Why don't they spend a
little more money on their bikes? "You can have it in any color you
want, as long as it's red." Aren't you cool! Like they even know what
a desmo-whatever engine is, anyway. Try finding the battery, you
Italian-wannabe racers! I never, ever wave at those guys.

Suzuki guys aren't much better, which is why I never wave at them,
either. They always have those stupid helmets sitting on top of their
stupid heads, and God forbid they should wear any safety gear. They
make me so mad. Sometimes they'll speed by and look over at me and
you know what I do? I don't wave. I just keep on going.

Please, don't get me started on Kawasaki guys. Ninjas? What are you,
twelve years old? Team Green my ass. I never wave
at Kawasaki guys.

I ride a Honda, and I'll only wave at Honda guys, but even then, I'll
never wave at a guy in full leathers. Never, never, never. Yeah, like
you're going to get your knee down on the New York Thruway. Nice
crotch, by the way. Guys in full leathers will never get a wave from
me, and by the way, neither will the guys in two-piece leathers. And
I'll tell you who else I'm not waving at -- those guys with the
helmets with the loud paintjobs. Four pounds of paint on a two pound
helmet - like I'm going to wave back to that! I'll also never wave at
someone with a mirrored visor. Or helmet stickers. Or racing gloves.
Or hiking boots.

To me, motorcycling is a like a family, a close-knit brotherhood of
people who ride Hondas, wear jeans and a leather jacket (not Vanson)
with regular gloves and a solid-color helmet with a clear visor, no
stickers, no racing gloves and regular boots (not Timberlands). And
isn't that what really makes riding so special?

--- In [hidden email], "Skip" <drumwoulf@...> wrote:

>
> Nuthin' wrong with Hondas in my book. I've owned plenty of good ones. Plus Yamahas, Vespas, and PGO (Buddy) scooters too. And who knows, I may even really like and buy a new and more reliable RE now! ">})
>
> One thing I don't like tho is immature bikers who feel they need to 'protect' the brand they're obsessed with, so they have to put the riders of other marques down! Motorbiking is a sport I've loved for many decades, but unfortunately there's always been a few who feel they have to try to ruin the joy that others feel in the sport because these others may not think exactly the same way they do about it..
>
> AFAIC there's nothing wrong with liking to work and tinker on older, less sophisticated vintage-style machinery. Nor is there anything wrong with not particularly liking to do this, but loving to ride!
>
> Live and let live...
> drummer
>
>
> --- In [hidden email], "deejay" <deejay_nh@> wrote:
> >
> > To each his own, have fun on your Hondaville.
> >
> >
>


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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

deejay_nh
In reply to this post by Skip-8
Calm down, it was a joke... Before the Bullet I owned a 2003 Triumph Bonnie, a 79 Vespa, and an Aprilia scooter. I am however very immature.



--- In [hidden email], "Skip" <drumwoulf@...> wrote:

>
> Nuthin' wrong with Hondas in my book. I've owned plenty of good ones. Plus Yamahas, Vespas, and PGO (Buddy) scooters too. And who knows, I may even really like and buy a new and more reliable RE now! ">})
>
> One thing I don't like tho is immature bikers who feel they need to 'protect' the brand they're obsessed with, so they have to put the riders of other marques down! Motorbiking is a sport I've loved for many decades, but unfortunately there's always been a few who feel they have to try to ruin the joy that others feel in the sport because these others may not think exactly the same way they do about it..
>
> AFAIC there's nothing wrong with liking to work and tinker on older, less sophisticated vintage-style machinery. Nor is there anything wrong with not particularly liking to do this, but loving to ride!
>
> Live and let live...
> drummer
>
>
> --- In [hidden email], "deejay" <deejay_nh@> wrote:
> >
> > To each his own, have fun on your Hondaville.
> >
> >
>


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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

Pete Snidal
In reply to this post by Skip-8
> Hi
> I looked at Pete's Manual in the files section here and it almost scared
> me away from considering Enfields..! At 71 yrs of age, and after 30 years
> of riding, there's no way I would go back to having a bike I have to
> constantly tune up! -And do valve adjustments at evey 1K miles? -No
> flippin' way, bros! (Not even if just consisted of simple screw turning
> adjustments!) -There's no way I would again consider such an
> unsophisticated machine that it required constant fussing and adjusting
> just to keep it running!
> .

I was wondering who was going to buy UCE's! (grin)
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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

Sali Rostami
In reply to this post by David in Fort Lauderdale
--- >
> > I looked at Pete's Manual in the files section here and it almost scared me away from considering Enfields..!


  Really, is Pete's manual in the file section?

  What our  veteran motorcyclist friend fails to realize is that the manual does not apply to the UCE. He should understand that this new RE should probably need as much attention to repair and adjustment as a household appliance  -- like refrigerator.

  I have developed a regard and appreciation for my RE Classic 350; but, I doubt that I should ever develope the same for KitchenAide.

  Al in Philadelphia

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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

Dave Murray-2
In reply to this post by deejay_nh
Hell, DeeJay, I'm on an '07 Triumph, these days, and even I knew you were takin' the piss.
The "no maintenance" Bike hasn't been built. I've known those who thought they had one, which you can easily tell by looking at their bike.
DWM

--- In [hidden email], "deejay" <deejay_nh@...> wrote:
>
> Calm down, it was a joke... Before the Bullet I owned a 2003 Triumph Bonnie, a 79 Vespa, and an Aprilia scooter. I am however very immature.


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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

t120rbullet
In reply to this post by Pete Snidal
--- In [hidden email], snidey@... wrote:

> I was wondering who was going to buy UCE's! (grin)


I did, a 2009 G5 black standard.
Not planning on selling either one of my old kick-only Bullets.
Not planning on selling the HD or the Triumphs either. Well, maybe the HD if I could find a sucker(read free spirit)to buy it.
The Triumphs are my 401K.

Didn't buy it to shy away from the minimal maintenance my older Bullets require.
I just had to know for myself everything there was to know about the new engine. Just couldn't sit by and read little tidbits here and there about it on the net.

I'll report as I get to know it as to whether or not it makes it to my Pox list like the ES and the AVL did. LOL

So there you have it!
Sooooooo when is your UCE manual coming out?
CJ



 


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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

Skip-8
In reply to this post by Sali Rostami
Well there's something in the files by Pete that talks about maintanence and valve adjustments... -Say man, haven't you been here longer than me?

Anyhow I'm looking forward to test riding (and maybe buying) a Royal Enfrigerator...">}) -If the '09 UCE gives me as little trouble as my '07 Vespa GT-200, and rides even 1/2 as well, then there should be no problem with me getting one, looking and sounding as great as they do!

I like Philly too; I bought my second scooter there, an '07 Buddy 125, from a great dealership called Philadelphia Scooters on Passyunk Ave. I test rode it around South Philly for a while, (racing the shop's owner over and around those ^%#$%* trolly tracks!) and had so much fun doing it I had to buy the thing! But it's prolly the scoot I'd sell to get some $$ down towards an Enfield, as I love the  Vespa's classic/mod looks and the great way it handles way too much to let go of it! (And it's damn near maintanence free also, so I'm sorry to disappoint you again on that point...) ">})

drummer


--- In [hidden email], "Al" <k3eax@...> wrote:

>
> --- >
> > > I looked at Pete's Manual in the files section here and it almost scared me away from considering Enfields..!
>
>
>   Really, is Pete's manual in the file section?
>
>   What our  veteran motorcyclist friend fails to realize is that the manual does not apply to the UCE. He should understand that this new RE should probably need as much attention to repair and adjustment as a household appliance  -- like refrigerator.
>
>   I have developed a regard and appreciation for my RE Classic 350; but, I doubt that I should ever develope the same for KitchenAide.
>
>   Al in Philadelphia
>


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Re: Pete's manual not suitable for 2009 UCE's?

Skip-8
In reply to this post by deejay_nh


With the Vespa and the Bonnie you sound like a man after me own heart, boyo! (It's right after St. Pat's day..) ">})

I'm currently riding '07 GT200 and Buddy 125cc scooters. Before them I had an '05 Honda 250cc Reflex scooter which I grew to hate because of it's bone-shaking rock hard crummy suspension!
And before that I rode a '91 CB750 Honda Nighthawk for many years. I liked that bike a lot, but as I grew a bit older I got tired of it's top heavy weight and it's truck-like steering. (Compared to the scooters anyway...)

I've had many other different bikes over the years (including an '81 1100cc Gold Wing full dresser), but they were all Hondas and Yamahas. I preferred their lower maintanence requirements over the 1970 and 1980 Harleys my friends rode, which back then were always breaking down on road trips. I'm also currently interested in the 2009 Hinckley Bonneville, but it is a bit heavier and it reminds me somewhat of the Nighthawk I got rid of...

After riding the '81 Gold WIng tub for several years, I discovered I had a deep liking for lighter (250-750cc) bikes, and an equally deep distaste for big, heavy bikes. And of course now that I'm getting up there (just turned 71), I find I like smaller, lighter bikes even more! (But out of necessity now?) ">})

I plan to keep riding as long as I can hold a bike up and think clearly and maintain decent reflexes (all of which I still have and do), but I don't any longer feature riding tubs, or having to do anything extra in the way of maintanence (I do my own mostly) than I possibly have to!

Life is a ball tho, riding is still a blast, and growing older does have some interesting compensations.... (Like not giving much of a crap anymore about what others think about you, or what you ride either!)

Namaste,
~Skip~  ">})
(drummer)



--- In [hidden email], "deejay" <deejay_nh@...> wrote:
>
> Calm down, it was a joke... Before the Bullet I owned a 2003 Triumph Bonnie, a 79 Vespa, and an Aprilia scooter. I am however very immature.


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